by | Jul 14, 2020 | After Lockdown

July 2020

Lockdown Diary

Katie Oborn

July 2020: Restrictions are lifted, lockdown eases and people continue their lives alongside coronavirus.

I’ve been watching the life of a baby seagull unfold from a nesting gull on an old unused chimney pot on a house opposite. It hatched on June 7 th fledged and flew in the early days of July. During lockdown, seagulls became quieter, I heard less gull sounds from the skies and surrounding Coxside and Barbican area, instead they seemed to collect out on the sea water of Plymouth Sound in the mornings. I assume they were catching fish, with so much less easy-pickings of food waste around at the time. But now they are back, scavenging scraps from people again as outdoor dining, picnics, barbecues, fish and chips resume.

Those somewhat soundless restricted days of lockdown seem far away, being nearly four months ago. Days have started to fill up again. A much awaited visit to my  family, some meetups with friends old and new. Zoom meetings many days of the week.

There is a newfound awareness of germs hanging in the air between people, we are told by government scientists that small and large droplets can be stagnant in air for many minutes and spread this way, so of course that thought is there when meeting
up with different people.

However, the overall spread of coronavirus is currently declining nationally, though there have been localised flare-ups. This means that July has seen a shift, a major lift in lockdown measures. Named ‘Super Saturday’ the 4th of July onwards means pubs, restaurants and hairdressers re-opened, tourism is allowed to proceed once more, and households are allowed to stay away from home overnight.

We took a road trip to my parents in East Devon. On the A38 going away from Plymouth there was a traffic jam of caravans and roof racks as holiday makers make their way to the South West, on the first day that they are permitted to.

Multiple households are now permitted to meet and we are told it is ‘safe’ to be indoors now. It had been over three months since I’d seen my mum and dad, sister, brother-in-law and my treasured little nieces, Emily aged two and Beatrix nearly five. At five-years-old, Beatrix will remember this strange moment in history.

This new normality we find ourselves in looks almost like pre Covid times on the surface, yet it’s so different when you scratch in further. A discarded facemask on steps down to the sea, a shared dread of visiting a supermarket, ‘Stay Apart’ signs on streets and pavements and people unable to see a doctor or specialist. But Plymouth people out and about generally seem to be in good spirits, learning to live with the virus in their day to day life.

July 2020: Restrictions are lifted, lockdown eases and people continue their lives alongside coronavirus.

I’ve been watching the life of a baby seagull unfold from a nesting gull on an old unused chimney pot on a house opposite. It hatched on June 7 th fledged and flew in the early days of July. During lockdown, seagulls became quieter, I heard less gull sounds from the skies and surrounding Coxside and Barbican area, instead they seemed to collect out on the sea water of Plymouth Sound in the mornings. I assume they were catching fish, with so much less easy-pickings of food waste around at the time. But now they are back, scavenging scraps from people again as outdoor dining, picnics, barbecues, fish and chips resume.

Those somewhat soundless restricted days of lockdown seem far away, being nearly four months ago. Days have started to fill up again. A much awaited visit to my  family, some meetups with friends old and new. Zoom meetings many days of the week.

There is a newfound awareness of germs hanging in the air between people, we are told by government scientists that small and large droplets can be stagnant in air for many minutes and spread this way, so of course that thought is there when meeting
up with different people.

However, the overall spread of coronavirus is currently declining nationally, though there have been localised flare-ups. This means that July has seen a shift, a major lift in lockdown measures. Named ‘Super Saturday’ the 4th of July onwards means pubs, restaurants and hairdressers re-opened, tourism is allowed to proceed once more, and households are allowed to stay away from home overnight.

We took a road trip to my parents in East Devon. On the A38 going away from Plymouth there was a traffic jam of caravans and roof racks as holiday makers make their way to the South West, on the first day that they are permitted to.

Multiple households are now permitted to meet and we are told it is ‘safe’ to be indoors now. It had been over three months since I’d seen my mum and dad, sister, brother-in-law and my treasured little nieces, Emily aged two and Beatrix nearly five. At five-years-old, Beatrix will remember this strange moment in history.

This new normality we find ourselves in looks almost like pre Covid times on the surface, yet it’s so different when you scratch in further. A discarded facemask on steps down to the sea, a shared dread of visiting a supermarket, ‘Stay Apart’ signs on streets and pavements and people unable to see a doctor or specialist. But Plymouth people out and about generally seem to be in good spirits, learning to live with the virus in their day to day life.

Plymouth Boat trips restart but in line with all public transport facemasks must be worn on board

People in Plymouth city centre get on with their day to day lives whilst regaining their sense of humour

Discarded facemasks, the new plastic litter

Holiday makers flock to Devon as lockdown is eased

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